Participant Info

First Name
Julia
Last Name
Gruman Martins
Affiliation
King's College London
Website URL
https://juliamartins.co.uk
Keywords
Early Modern Europe, Gender History, History of Women, History of Medicine, History of the Book, Translation, Print, Material History, History of the Body, Cultural History, Sex and Reproduction, 16th century, 17th century, Italy, France, England.
Additional Contact Information
PhD Researcher - currently in her final year of submission. Available to take on new projects from the spring of 2022. Alternative email: juliagrumanmartins@gmail.com

Personal Info

Photo
About Me

Julia Martins is a PhD candidate at King’s College London, where she is examining the dissemination of early modern medicine in the 16th and 17th centuries through print. Her research focuses on how translation reshaped medical recipes, with a particular interest in gender and recipes about reproduction.

She completed her undergraduate studies in history at the Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS) in Brazil. Julia holds a joint Master’s degree (MRes awarded the distinction ‘très bien’) from the University of Bologna and the University of Paris Diderot (Sorbonne) in comparative history. For her Master’s research, she analysed translations of early modern Italian recipes into French and their diffusion in print. Having started her MPhil/PhD studies at the Warburg Institute in London, she transferred to KCL to work under the supervision of Laura Gowing and Evelyn Welch.

Julia’s specialisation is in the history of medicine and gender history. She has researched extensively on the representation of the body and women in early modern print in several languages. Her main focus is how translation reshapes knowledge and how that intersects with gender.

Recent Publications

“Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early Sixteenth Century”, Gendered Histories of Health, Healing and the Body, 1250-1550, edited by Sara Ritchey and Sharon Strocchia (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2020), p. 167-188.

“The Afterlife of Italian Secrets: Translating Medical Recipes in Early Modern Europe”, Crossing Borders, Crossing Cultures: Popular Print in Europe (1450-1900), edited by Massimo Rospocher, Jeroen Salman and Hannu Salmi, (Bologna: Il Mulino, 2019).

“Les livres de secrets imprimés et traduits en Europe: la circulation des secrets italiens entre 1555 et 1650”, Encyclo, Revue de l’école doctorale ED 382. Economie, Espaces, Sociétés, Civilisations, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, 2016.

“Entre Divertissements, médecine, savoirs domestiques et connaissances pratiques : la contribution du Bâtiment des recettes à l’histoire des savoirs”, Artefact. Techniques, histoire et sciences humaines, L’Europe Technicienne, n. 4, CNRS Editions, Paris, 2016 (Review of Geneviève Deblock, Le Bâtiment des recettes, Présentation et annotation de l’édition Jean Ruelle, 1560, Rennes, PUR, 2015), p. 418-420.

“Livros de segredos italianos e o desenvolvimento da ciência moderna”, Oficina do Historiador, v. 7, n. 2 (2014), p. 221-242.

Media Coverage
Country Focus
England, Italy, France
Expertise by Geography
England, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Western Europe
Expertise by Chronology
Pre-17th century, 17th century, Early Modern
Expertise by Topic
Book History, Family, Gender, Libraries & Archives, Material Culture, Medicine, Sexuality, Women