Participant Info

First Name
Liz
Last Name
Skilton
Affiliation
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Website URL
http://www.lizskilton.com/
Keywords
Disaster History, Environmental History, Women and Gender History, Twentieth Century U.S., Twenty-First Century U.S., Hurricanes, Floods, Weather, Gulf South History, Southern History, Louisiana History, Cultural History, Oral History, Digital Humanities, Public History
Additional Contact Information

Personal Info

Photo
About Me

Liz Skilton is an Assistant Professor of History and holds the J.J. Burdin M.D. and Helen B. Burdin/Board of Regents Endowed Professorship in Louisiana Studies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. She specializes in the history of disaster and human response to it. Her research has been featured in venues like National Geographic and The Washington Post.

Presently, she serves as part of the research faculty at the Institute for Coastal & Water Research (ICaWR), the Louisiana Watershed Flood Center, and the Center for Louisiana Studies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and as part of a National Science Foundation grant research team studying the impact of disaster on Louisiana. She is co-author of the textbook, The Louisiana Experience (2016), and recipient of a Louisiana Board of Regents Artists and Scholars Grant for her book manuscript, Tempest: Hurricane Naming & American Culture (forthcoming Spring 2019, LSU Press).

Recent Publications

1. Tempest: Hurricane Naming & American Culture, forthcoming (LSU Press, Spring 2019).

2. “Disasters Have Histories”: Teaching & Researching American Disasters, Co-Author, in OAH’s The American Historian, February 2018. Link here

3. The Louisiana Experience, Eighth Grade History Textbook, Co-Author (Layton, Utah: Gibbs Smith, Spring 2016).

Media Coverage
http://www.katc.com/story/35941943/ul-oral-history-project-targets-grand-shooting-floods
Country Focus
United States
Expertise by Geography
United States
Expertise by Chronology
20th century, 21st century
Expertise by Topic
Environment, Gender, Local & Regional, Public History, Science, Women