Participant Info

First Name
Hannah
Last Name
Yip
Affiliation
University of Regina
Website URL
https://bham.academia.edu/HannahYip
Keywords
early modern sermons, recreation, loneliness, Reformation studies, religious history, manuscript studies
Additional Contact Information

Personal Info

Photo
About Me

I specialise in early modern religious literature, visual culture, and the artistic pursuits of clergymen in post-Reformation England. Since completing my PhD thesis on images in the early modern English sermon, I have been awarded a number of Postdoctoral Fellowships including, most recently, a Royal Historical Society Early Career Fellowship.

Other research interests include loneliness, both in early modern writings and within the academy today. I am currently co-organising ‘The Experience of Loneliness in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries’ (online conference, University of Birmingham, 29–30 June 2021).

I have also worked as a consultant for the BBC’s acclaimed series, A House Through Time, uncovering crucial biographical material relating to an eighteenth-century Particular Baptist minister (Series 3, Episode 2).

 

Current Position: Research Assistant, ‘GEMMS – Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons’, University of Regina

Qualifications: DipABRSM, LRSM, BMus (Hons), MSt (Oxon) PhD AFHEA

 

 

Recent Publications

Yip, Hannah, ‘What was a Homily in Post-Reformation England?’, Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 72.1 (2021), 53–70

Yip, Hannah, ‘‘The text and the occasion mingled together make a chequer-worke, a mixture of black and white, mourning and joy’: Visual Elements of the Printed Funeral Sermon in Early Modern England’, in What is an Image in Medieval and Early Modern England?, ed. by Antoinina Bevan Zlatar and Olga Timofeeva (Tübingen: Narr Francke Attempto, 2017), pp. 157–182

Media Coverage
Country Focus
Expertise by Geography
British Isles, United Kingdom, United States
Expertise by Chronology
Pre-17th century, 17th century, Early Modern
Expertise by Topic
Book History, Libraries & Archives, Material Culture, Religion